marisa howard

ReuNight Returns: An Evening in Provence at The Nasher Sculpture Garden, Benefiting The Family Place

ReuNight: And just like that… life returns to a new normal in 2022, and social activities seem appropriate, especially when supporting one’s fave non-profit, such as The Family Place.

Roni Proter, Max Trowbridge, Shelle Sills, Marisa Howard at The Conservatory

Roni Proter, Max Trowbridge, Shelle Sills, Marisa Howard at The Conservatory

It’s been over ten years that, in some small way, I’ve supported The Family Place, either by attending events, through media partnerships, participating in Partners Card or as honorary chair of Partners Card in 2018. So it seemed perfectly appropriate to honor my dear friend Mimi Sterling‘s first year as CEO of The Family Place when they invited me to chair the ReuNight annual dinner gala. I’m also excited that my sweet friends Marisa Howard and Roni Proter Kelly will join me as co-chairs and that the legendary retail extraordinaire Shelle Sills will join us as the honorary chair. What a crew!

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Books: Bunheads, Sissies and Zuma

I rarely feature books, especially children’s books; I’m usually excited over the latest interior tome, an art-inspired coffee table book, or a fabulous fashion publication. But now I’m excited since I do have a couple of darling authors in my life, so let bias precede me, as I bestow a little nod in their direction. The best stories are always created from the beautiful intensity of reality, and all three of these books share this same thread of commonality.

Bunheads by Misty Copeland

Bunheads by Misty Copeland

First off, I’ll start with Bunheads by Misty Copeland, and no, I don’t know Misty, but I’ve purchased this book to give to a young family member, who is, of course, a budding ballerina. New York Times bestselling author, in this book, Misty captures the elegance of her younger self, as a young ballerina graciously accepting the role she performs in the ballet Coppélia. A story of goals, accomplishments and acceptance, Misty Copeland, clearly shares a moment that she experienced at a young age. Making history in 2015, Ms Copeland is the first black woman to achieve the position of principal dancer for the American Ballet Theatre, and this darling book is a gift of grace for any ballerina.

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