Art

Artrinity – Postcards of Positivity benefiting Artist Relief

Good things do come in small packages, and a polite little postcard, a token of positive communication, is the inspiration behind the second project for Artrinity — the art venture I share with my business partners Joyce Goss and Kenny Goss. The exhibition, Postcards of Positivity, During the Pandemic, evolved from our conversations during the initial days of the Coronavirus lockdown, we all agreed, “We need to do something!”

Maja, 2020, ink on paper, 4 x 6 inches, Francisco Moreno

Maja, 2020, ink on paper, Francisco Moreno

Post Suspension II, 2020, watercolor and collage on paper, 4 x 6 inches, Juan Alberto Negroni

Post Suspension II, 2020, watercolor and collage on paper, Juan Alberto Negroni

Mother Tongue II, 2020, graphite on paper, 4 x 6 inches, Corrie Thompson

Mother Tongue II, 2020, graphite on paper, Corrie Thompson

Before, 2020, charcoal on paper, 4 x 6 inches, Adam Ball

Before, 2020, charcoal on paper, Adam Ball

For me, philanthropic philosophies thrive during moments of critical circumstances, with the innate desire to serve and to initiate a cause for action. Selfishly perhaps, yet always propelling, the need to give, to think beyond oneself, rather than dwell on the impossible — it helps to focus on others by using one’s capabilities.

As we all grappled with the concept of COVID-19, a sense of shock seeped through my soul and the quote from Maya Angelou, resonated through my mind, “I have found among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver.” And artists have given, supporting their community!

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Artist Adam Ball Chats About Life, while in Lockdown in London

Lockdown and locked out! Creativity is the heartbeat, soul, and lifeline of every artist, and when the ability to create is compromised, the effects can be life-changing. I recently reached out to a good friend, British artist Adam Ball, based in London, to ask him how he was handling lockdown. On a brighter note though, we mostly engaged in a general chit chat, or chinwag, as us Brits prefer to describe an ebb and flow of casual conversation between friends.

 

Detail of Taman Negara, hand-cut paperwith pinpricks by Adam Ball - 1

Detail of Taman Negara, 2009, hand-cut paper with pinpricks by Adam Ball

 

I met Adam Ball back in 2014 when he visited Dallas to attend MTV RE:DEFINE—he donated a work, Shine, a black paper-cutout abstraction of his DNA reflected over gold leaf paper, which completely fascinated me. Adam is known for his intricate hand-cut paper and textile cutouts, a craft of intense, dedicated focus. In September that same year, he exhibited at The Goss-Michael Foundation for a second time, a solo show, The Space Between, showcasing his intricate hand-cut transparent works in textiles and paper, some with charcoal, while other works highlighted with LEDs. 

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A chat with online artstar gallery founder Chrissy Corredor

So, which one do I select, Chanel 2 or Party Girl by Liz Von Hoene, or, maybe a little jungle fever with Disco in the Jungle: Forever Wild by Yee Wong. Last month I collaborated with online art gallery, ArtStar, on an inspiring project with my dear oh-so-stylish friend Gregg Asher.

Party Girl by Liz Von Hoene, ArtStar

Party Girl by Liz Von Hoene, ArtStar

Gregg introduced me to ArtStar during the summer and asked if I would join him on an online collaboration curating a collection of our favourite works. An ArtStar aficionado, Gregg has previously shopped on the gallery-esque digital boutique, so I am grateful for the introduction—perfectly my kind of artful destination.

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Marquis Duriel Lewis aka RETNA exhibits Dovetail Mortises and Peluca Grande

A significant thunderstorm almost eclipsed the opening night for the exhibition of Dovetail Mortises & Peluca Grande by L.A.-based graffiti artist Marquis Duriel Lewis (aka RETNA) last week, presented by The Goss-Michael Foundation.

Marquis Duriel Lewis, RETNA, shot by Joshua White

Marquis Duriel Lewis, aka RETNA. Photo by Joshua White.

That night, ardent street-graffiti fans, intrigued art patrons and RETNA’s sweet Mum, who had come to Dallas to enjoy her son’s celebration—waited for his imminent yet delayed arrival. Sadly, the private jet was rerouted north of Dallas to avoid the storms; however, the crowd continued to revel amid the revered artwork, soaking in the vibrant abstract storytelling of RETNA’s Brimstones.

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Contemporary Art Gallery 12.26 Opens with Waters

You could say that Hilary and Hannah Fagadau are really twins, simply born years apart. But besides sharing the same stylish fashion gene, the ability to complete each other’s sentences, and similar voice intonations, they also share the same birthday — and that birth date 12.26 represents the name of their new contemporary art gallery.

Hilary Fagadau and Hannah Fagadau

Hilary Fagadau and Hannah Fagadau

At the end of the month, the sisters will debut their 12.26 business venture with an inaugural exhibition titled Waters. The show will present an artful conversation between two female artists, Alex Olson based in Los Angeles and Nancy Shaver from Jefferson, New York. Respectively, the paintings and sculptures combined offer a reflective dialogue encompassing the relationship of water in each medium. 

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Art as Fashion or Fashion as Art – Anne Damgaard

As New York Fashion Week calls it a wrap this September, Dallas’ style aficionados will experience fashion as an alternative form—like visual art. A first for art space SITE131, as Joan Davidow director and curator of the gallery, debut’s a fashion presentation titled How Fitting It Is, featuring Danish textile artist Anne Damgaard.

The Eternal Moment, 2017 by Anne Damgaard

The Eternal Moment, 2017, by Anne Damgaard

A visual artist based in Copenhagen, Denmark, Damgaard, graduated from the Danish School of Art and Design in 1997 and pursued her fascination with textiles as an artist and a designer. Utilizing the unique properties of fabrics as her medium of choice—Damgaard works with delicate gauzes, creating layers of movement in light and dark that transcend textiles into a form of expression. Never imagined as actual items of clothing, these works of art, architectural sculptures, are the assimilation between the form of the female body and textiles.

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